All You Need Is Kill | Light Novel Review

My book review of the Japanese light novel All You Need Is Kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka.

This light novel was the basis for the Tom Cruise film, Edge of Tomorrow.

From the Back Cover:

When the alien Mimics invade, Keiji Kiriya is just one of many recruits shoved into a suit of battle armor called a Jacket and sent out to kill. Keiji dies on the battlefield, only to be reborn each morning to fight and die again and again. On his 158th iteration, he gets a message from a mysterious ally–the female soldier known as the Full Metal Bitch. Is she the key to Keiji’s escape or his final death?

Light Novel Feature

Newest Obsession – Light Novels

If you ever decide to peruse my blog archives, you’ll notice a recurring fandom of anime.

Some people don’t realize many of the current anime are adapted from novels.

These works, Light Novels, are usually in the realm of 50,000 words (about 200-215 pages) and aimed at a 15-25 year old audience. Another aspect of Light Novels is they are almost always a series (sometimes having ten or more volumes).

For a long time, the only way for English speaking audiences to enjoy Light Novels was to read fan driven translation projects. While some of these were decent, there were far more which suffered from horrid grammar and editing. A few I tried were unreadable.

But thanks to a growing fanbase for anime and manga, a few English publishers are getting on board and bringing some more popular Light Novels to market.

My current hero publisher is Yen On, a sub-press of Yen Press, who have been releasing manga for a number of years. A few other publishers are releasing the odd title, but Yen On puts out four or more Light Novels per month. Some examples are Sword Art Online, Is It Wrong To Try To Pick Up Girls In A Dungeon, The Devil is a Part-Timer, Durarara!! and many more.

I love to read, but find myself increasingly pressed for time to do so. With Light Novels being relatively short and a not-too-taxing read, I’m able to breeze through a volume or two per week.

I’ve had a YouTube channel for a number of years, but have never found a real niche for it. The past two months I’ve been posting my reviews of Light Novels each week and it’s helped provide me with some focus.

I originally kept my Light Novel reviews separate from this site, but I’ve now decided to start posting them here. At least it will give a little life to the place 🙂

So what do you think? Are you reading any Light Novels? Or would you rather watch the anime? Let me know in the comments.

Help an Indie Author Out

Let’s get something out of the way right now, I suck at marketing.

Sure, I read all the websites that promise their easy steps will tremendously boost my book sales. Tips like “find your audience” and “get involved with social media” do nothing for me.

The main reason I suck at marketing is because I don’t like it.

I see authors creating Facebook events for their book releases, blog tours, pimping their book every other tweet, they’re on message boards talking up their books, and offering all sorts of promos and freebies.

I go on those same social networks and post the cool article I found on little known facts about Return of the Jedi (this is the link BTW).

Sure, I post things on my website, and when a new book is coming out, or like the recent free promo for Revelation Game, I’ll do the odd post on Facebook or Twitter. But anything more than one or two makes me feel…Dirty.

Now, what I’m about to ask, it applies to all the indie authors you enjoy. Because all of us can use this exact same help. It’s only two simple things.

  1. Leave comments on Amazon, B&N, Goodreads, wherever books are sold/discussed.
  2. Recommend the book to your friends who you think would like it.

Leaving Comments

I don’t need to explain this one to you. I mean, I buy books too. We hear about a book, or click on those “someone else looking at this purchased that” links, and almost immediately check out the comments.

When a book has lots of comments, I assume

  • It sells well
  • People are passionate about it.

And that’s not even counting what the comments say, or what the rating is.

Now I’m not saying you need to gush about the book. The best reviews are the ones that are balanced and honest. When I look at a book, I only look at the 2-4 star reviews. Because 1 star reviews generally hated the book so much I never get a sense of whether I might like it, and 5 star reviews love it so much, well, it’s the same thing.

Not that I would EVER turn down a 5 star review. Heck no. I’m super pleased when that happens. I’m just saying your views are valid, even if you didn’t totally hate, or love, the book.

To give you an idea of how few people comment; right now, on Amazon, Harbinger has 14 reviews. It’s not bad, and there are some great reviews. But this represents only about 0.5% of the people who have purchased Harbinger. Where are the others? What did all those other people think? Based on the number of copies of book two, Suture, that have sold, I’d say far more than only 0.5% enjoyed Harbinger.

So, knowing the importance of reviews, and how few people leave them, trust me, you are doing any author a huge favour by leaving a comment on their work. Not just for sales, but even to let them know how you felt about the work. I know I like hearing about it.

Tell Your Friends

I dream of being a “word of mouth” author. The thought that people would pass my book around, let friends check it out, is huge to me. That’s part of the reason I disabled DRM on my books.

When polls are done on how people found new authors, every single one I’ve seen puts “A friend recommended it to me” at the top. In the book industry, word of mouth has always been the most powerful selling tool. Hence why comments are so important. But hearing words of praise from a trusted friend, not just some random internet stranger, carries more weight.

If every review on Amazon hated a book, but my wife said she loved it and I would too, I would read the book. Because I trust her tastes and her knowledge of mine.

Shameless Begging

So hey, if you liked any of my works, go leave a comment somewhere, blog about it, tell some friends, and/or send me an email. Any and all of those are awesome.

If you want my participation in anything, send me an email or direct message on Twitter.

A Huge Thank You

To those who have taken the time to write comments, thank you. It’s because of you first, brave souls that my books have sold. And yeah, that includes even those who didn’t like the books, or found some faults with them.

Like I said, balanced comments are great.

So now that I’ve written this, I feel like I should be ashamed. I guess it’s because you’ve already done something great for me just by reading my book, or visiting this blog. You took time for my words, and in our time driven society, that’s pretty amazing. But I’m going to be strong and let this post live. And remember, all authors, especially lesser known ones, could use this help.

You might not realize how a few kind words about our books makes our day. Trust me, it’s powerful.

Thanks so much for checking this post out and giving it some consideration.

Talk to you again soon,

JR